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Saturday, October 17, 2020 | History

5 edition of Cultural and sociological aspects of alcoholism and substance abuse found in the catalog.

Cultural and sociological aspects of alcoholism and substance abuse

  • 311 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Haworth Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Substance abuse -- United States,
    • Alcoholism -- United States

    • Edition Notes

      StatementBarry Stimmel, editor.
      ContributionsStimmel, Barry, 1939-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHV4999.2 .C84 1984
      The Physical Object
      Pagination84 p. ;
      Number of Pages84
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2850694M
      ISBN 100866563679
      LC Control Number84012985

      Part of the Research Advances in Alcohol and Drug Problems book series (AADP, volume 7) Beyond the Shadow ofProhibition, Report of a Panel on Alternative Policies Affecting the Prevention of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Academy Press, Washington Boom R. () Sociological Aspects of the Disease Concept of Alcoholism. In.   Substance use problems are often referred to as family affairs, and this book is useful in addressing treatment for substance use disorders from the perspectives of the family and culture. The book contains two introductory chapters and eight chapters on various cultural .

      Many different factors influence addiction and recovery. So far we have discussed the biological and psychological influences. However, there are also sociological forces. These forces cause entire groups of people to be more vulnerable to addiction. If you are a member of a vulnerable group, then you are more vulnerable. Sociology is a science that primarily concerns itself with understanding the behavior of large groups. These groups include families, organizations, societies, and cultures). From this perspective, addiction is a harmful behavior that affects both individuals and groups.

      Sociological theories attribute drug use to various aspects of the social environment, including peer influences, weak social bonds, and the larger drug culture. For Your Review When you think about the reasons for drug use and addiction, do you think biological factors, psychological factors, or the social environment play the most important role? Cultural and Sociological Aspects of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 46 (4), – (). Article Tools Add to Favorites Email to a Friend Download Citation Track Citations.


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Cultural and sociological aspects of alcoholism and substance abuse Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cultural and Sociological Aspects of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse [Stimmel, Barry] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Cultural and Sociological Aspects of Alcoholism and Substance AbuseCited by: 5. In this highly informative book on the sociocultural interactions between alcoholism and drug abuse, experts explore the relationship of such factors as ethnicity, family, religion, and gender to chemical abuse and address important implications for by: 5.

Book Description. In this highly informative book on the sociocultural interactions between alcoholism and drug abuse, experts explore the relationship of such factors as ethnicity, family, religion, and gender to chemical abuse and address important implications for treatment.

ContentsThe Role of Ethnography in Alcoholism and Substance Abuse: The Nature Versus Nurture Controversy The Role of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse Causal Attribution of Drinking Antecedents in American Indian and Caucasian Social Drinkers Influence of Family and Religion on Long-Term Outcomes Among Opiod Addicts women, Alcohol and Sexuality Sex.

In this highly informative book on the sociocultural interactions between alcoholism and drug abuse, experts explore the relationship of such factors as ethnicity, family, religion, and gender to chemical abuse and address important implications for treatment.

Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers. Synopsis In this highly informative book on the sociocultural interactions between alcoholism and drug abuse, experts explore the relationship of such factors as ethnicity, family, religion, and gender to chemical abuse and address important implications for treatment.

The role of culture in substance use and abuse. Sociocultural beliefs can shape the approach to and behavior regarding substance use and abuse. Culture plays a central role in forming the expectations of individuals about potential problems they may face with drug use.

1 For many social groups, this may provide a protective factor. An example. The Cultural Impact on Alcoholism and Addiction Rates When considering the cultural influence on the development of alcoholism and addiction, it is important to define what culture means.

“It [culture] is a system of patterns of belief and behavior that shape the worldview of the member of society,” says researcher Dwight Heath. Discussion. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all the studies on drinking and drug problems that embody Bacon’s proposed program of research (for two classic volumes on alcohol consumption, see Barrows and Room ; Pittman and Snyder ).Nevertheless, the literature on alcohol and other drugs that is presented in this article reveals a sociology of drinking and drug.

Heath, D.B., "Alcohol and Aggression," pp. in Gottheil, E., et al. Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Aggression, Charles C Thomas, Springfield, IL,p. "Interestingly enough, even in our own society, aggression seems never to be an important component in the image of drunken comportment on the part of women.".

This book represents the first academic effort to apply major sociological theories to the field of substance use and abuse in order to provide readers with a solid knowledge base from which they may develop more informed ideas about prevention, intervention, treatment, law enforcement, and social reactions to this ubiquitous social problem.

Many different factors influence addiction and recovery. So far we have discussed the biological and psychological influences. However, there are also sociological forces. These forces cause entire groups of people to be more vulnerable to addiction.

If you are a. Social and cultural forces can cause entire groups of people to be more vulnerable to addiction. If you are a member of a vulnerable group, then you are more vulnerable to addiction. For our purposes, the term culture describes a group's learned and shared pattern of values and beliefs.

These values and beliefs guide group members' behavior and. This understanding can be even more important when addressing the role of drug culture in a client's life because, of all cultural affiliations, it is likely to be the one most intimately connected with his or her substance abuse.

The drug culture is likely to have had a considerable influence on the client's behaviors related to substance use. This being said, the NSDUH Report publishes that between andAfrican Americans needed treatment for alcohol abuse or addiction less than that other ethnic or racial groups: % versus %, respectively.

African Americans were more likely to need treatment for illicit drug abuse and addiction, however. Alcoholism and non-addicted alcohol abuse can have a widespread impact on the health of the family unit.

For example, decades of research document the two-way connection between alcohol problems and marital/relationship strife. Specific relationship issues associated with the presence of alcoholism and alcohol abuse include.

Re-interpretation is a helpful technique but we cannot re-interpret something if we are unaware of it. Most social and cultural forces exert their influence without any conscious awareness of it. Therefore, it can be vitally important to know and appreciate the various cultures that influence us.

Alcohol and Health(National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism [NIAAA] ) in four areas: family history of alcoholism, develop-mental issues, motivations, and alcohol-related cognitions (beliefs about alcohol).

Recent research into the causes of alcoholism emphasizes the links between biological and psychosocial. Culture/religion. There are many cultural and religious-based triggers for addiction such as the geographical area in which you grow up, religious beliefs prevalent in your culture, early.

Social and cultural forces can cause entire groups of people to be more vulnerable to addiction. If you are a member of a vulnerable group, then you are more vulnerable to addiction.

For our purposes, the term culture describes a group's learned and shared pattern of values and beliefs. Room R: Sociological aspects of the disease concept of alcoholism, in Smart RC, Glaser FB, Israel Y, et al (eds): Research Advances in Alcohol and Drug Problems (vol 7).

New York, Plenum Press,p Google Scholar.The sociological perspective stands in direct opposition to what might be called the chemicalistic fallacy—the view that drug A causes behavior X, that what we see as behavior and effects associated with a given drug are solely (or even mainly) a function of the biochemical properties of that drug, of the drug plus the human animal, or even.Discover librarian-selected research resources on Drug Abuse from the Questia online library, including full-text online books, academic journals, magazines, newspapers and more.

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